Belmont Lagoon Spit Walk
Awabakal Country

50 min to 1 h

3.3 km
return

↑ 10 m
↓ -10 m

Moderate track
The Belmont Lagoon Spit walk in Belmont is a quiet relaxing walk surrounded by water. This walk is best completed in the early morning or late afternoon, when the bird life is most active. You may see Black Swans, Spoon Bills and if you are lucky, the migratory Bar Tailed Godwit. This walk is close to Redhead Beach and could happily be combined with a dip or a beach stroll. The Belmont Lagoon is a sanctuary for wildlife in the area. Let us begin by acknowledging the Awabakal people, Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present. 
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Belmont Lagoon Car Park with locked gate and sign. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Belmont Lagoon Sign off Beach Road in Belmont. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Belmont Lagoon Signage at Belmont Lagoon Car Park. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Track through vegetation to foot bridge at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Track to foot bridge at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Foot bridge over creek at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Metal foot bridge over creek at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Creek at Belmont lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Creek at Belmont Lagoon with the sun low. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Metal foot bridge over the creek at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Belmont Lagoon foot bridge over the creek. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Metal foot bridge over the Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Track near the foot bridge over the creek at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Narrow trail at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Views over the Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Still water over Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Still water over Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Views over Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Views out over the Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Still water over the creek at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Trees beside the creek at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Trail and intersection at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Intersection and power lines at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Intersection with trails at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Wide trail at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Start of spit walk at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Spit walk and large pile of concrete at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Concrete block at Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Trail to spit in Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Pile of rubbish on the walk to the spit in Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Trail though forest on the spit in Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Trail on the spit in Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Tree's on the trail to the spit in Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Tree's beside the trail in Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Still swampy pool near the spit in Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Flower on the spit in Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Views over the Belmont Lagoon from the spit. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
End of the Belmont Lagoon Spit with derelict buildings . | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
Derelict buildings and a burnt out car at the end of Belmont Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2011.
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Safer Bushwalks
Tips on staying safe on track
Before you start any bushwalk ensure you;
• Tell someone you trust where you are going and what to do if you are overdue
• Have adequate equipment, supplies, skills & knowledge for the whole journey
• Consider the impact of weather forecasts, park/track closures & fire dangers
• Can respond to emergencies & call for help at any point
• Are healthy and fit enough for this journey
If not, change plans and stay safe. It is okay to delay and ask people for help.
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Getting There
Transport options and directions
Start (-33.0481388,151.6582314)
Mode Bus Car (There is free parking available.)
DirectionsFrom Newcastle Road, A15
  • Turn on to Newcastle Road, A15 then drive for 1.3 km
  • Turn right onto Croudace Street, A37 and drive for another 4.7 km
  • Keep right onto Newcastle Inner City Bypass, A37 and drive for another 13.5 km
  • Turn left onto Beach Street and drive for another 280 m
  • Turn left and drive for another 145 m
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Track Notes
Turn by turn instructions & maps
Getting started
From the Belmont Lagoon car park (off Ocean Park Road, Belmont), this walk passes around the locked metal gate and crosses the cricket oval, passing the 'Belmont Lagoon Reserve Map' sign and keeping the houses to your left. This walk continues for about 200m across the oval and then across a footbridge over Cold Tea Creek, to come to a three-way intersection with a track (on the Cold Tea Walkway).
Turn right: From the intersection, this walk follows the trail, initially keeping the footbridge and creek on your right and Belmont Lagoon on your left. This walk continues for about 700m, until coming to a four-way intersection with a large trail, and a faint trail directly ahead.....
Turn map Directions & comments
The alternate route finishes here. Continue straight to rejoin the main route at the 0 m waypoint. Details below.
Start.
There is a car park (about 70 m back from the start).
Belmont Lagoon Car Park (about 10 m back from the start).
Belmont Lagoon Car Park
Belmont Lagoon Car Park

The Belmont Lagoon car park (access from corner Beach St and Ocean Park Rd, Belmont) is an open grassed car park, with an information sign detailing existing and proposed walking tracks at the lagoon. There is a water tap available about 100m north of the car park (adjacent to the cricket oval). Please respect the private houses that abutt onto the car park.
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The Belmont Lagoon car park (access from corner Beach St and Ocean Park Rd, Belmont) is an open grassed car park, with an information sign detailing existing and proposed walking tracks at the lagoon. There is a water tap available about 100m north of the car park (adjacent to the cricket oval). Please respect the private houses that abutt onto the car park.

Find the gate at the start.
After 120 m find the "Belmont Lagoon" (20 m on your right).
Belmont Lagoon
Belmont Lagoon

Belmont Lagoon is situated between the Pacific Ocean and Lake Macquarie in the community of Belmont. This reserve is a sanctuary for five distinct biotic areas - Swamp Forest, Swamp Heath, Reed Swamp, Sedge Land and Open Water. All these different areas interact and are important in allowing natural areas to be ecological sustainable. There is more information on these biotic areas at the Belmont Lagoon car park (off Beach St, Belmont). Human history of the lagoon began with the Awabakal people who occupied the area for perhaps the last 6000 years. The ancient Awabakal legend of The Teardrop of the Moon tells how Belmont Lagoon was formed. During World War II, the Department of Defence dredged Cold Tea Creek to provide an anti-tank barrier and defence line. As part of these modifications, the lagoon was divided into two parts, and it now has a permanent connection to the saline waters of Lake Macquarie, thereby altering its salinity and circulation pattern. For more information, contact Lake Macquarie Visitor Information Centre on (02) 4921 0740.
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Belmont Lagoon is situated between the Pacific Ocean and Lake Macquarie in the community of Belmont. This reserve is a sanctuary for five distinct biotic areas - Swamp Forest, Swamp Heath, Reed Swamp, Sedge Land and Open Water. All these different areas interact and are important in allowing natural areas to be ecological sustainable. There is more information on these biotic areas at the Belmont Lagoon car park (off Beach St, Belmont). Human history of the lagoon began with the Awabakal people who occupied the area for perhaps the last 6000 years. The ancient Awabakal legend of The Teardrop of the Moon tells how Belmont Lagoon was formed. During World War II, the Department of Defence dredged Cold Tea Creek to provide an anti-tank barrier and defence line. As part of these modifications, the lagoon was divided into two parts, and it now has a permanent connection to the saline waters of Lake Macquarie, thereby altering its salinity and circulation pattern. For more information, contact Lake Macquarie Visitor Information Centre on (02) 4921 0740.

After another 90 m cross the bridge (about 35 m long)
Turn right.
After another 730 m turn left.
After another 270 m continue straight.
Continue another 390 m to find the end. Then turn around here and retrace the main route for 1.6 km to get back to the start.
About 10 m past the end is "Belmont Lagoon Spit".
Belmont Lagoon Spit
Belmont Lagoon Spit

The Belmont Lagood spit is surrounded by water and bird life. This is a fabulous place to enjoy in the early morning or evening, when bird life is most active. Birds you are likely to see include the Black Swan, Royal Spoonbill, Superb Blue Wren, Variegated Wren, Blackfaced Cuckoo Shrike, Eastern Whip Bird, Welcome Swallow and the international migatory waders, such as the Bar-Tailed Godwit. At the end of the spit, there are two derelict buildings and a burnt-out car. The spit is a good place to see the main biotic areas, including reed swamp, swamp heath, swamp forest, sedge land and open water.
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The Belmont Lagood spit is surrounded by water and bird life. This is a fabulous place to enjoy in the early morning or evening, when bird life is most active. Birds you are likely to see include the Black Swan, Royal Spoonbill, Superb Blue Wren, Variegated Wren, Blackfaced Cuckoo Shrike, Eastern Whip Bird, Welcome Swallow and the international migatory waders, such as the Bar-Tailed Godwit. At the end of the spit, there are two derelict buildings and a burnt-out car. The spit is a good place to see the main biotic areas, including reed swamp, swamp heath, swamp forest, sedge land and open water.


Take this Alternate route if you want to do something a bit different on the way back, there is some road walking.
Turn map Directions & comments
Start.
After another 520 m veer right, to head along Ocean Park Road.
After another 200 m continue straight, to head along Ocean Park Road.
After another 130 m pass the "Belmont Cemetery" (on your left).
After another 150 m (at the intersection of Ocean Park Road & Green Street) continue straight, to head along Ocean Park Road.
After another 30 m (at the intersection of Ocean Park Road & Williams Street) continue straight, to head along Ocean Park Road.
After another 80 m (at the intersection of Ocean Park Road & Beach Street) turn right (a vehicle track).
After another 150 m come to the end.
A gate.
About 25 m past the end is a car park.
At the end of this alternate route, rejoin the main route.
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Terrain
Know the Hills, grading & facilities

Belmont Lagoon Spit Walk


Grading
Class 3/6
Moderate track
Length 3.3 km
Time 50 min to 1 h
Quality of track Clear and well formed track or trail (2/6)
Gradient Gentle hills with occasional steps (2/6)
Signage Directional signs along the way (3/6)
Infrastructure Generally useful facilities (such as fenced cliffs and seats) (1/6)
Experience Required No experience required (1/6)
Weather Weather generally has little impact on safety (1/6)
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